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Dinah Washington: Back To The Blues Pure Pleasure SR 25189

9812

28,99 €TTC

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Description du produit

Disque vinyle de 180 grammes, Pure Pleasure Records, fabriqué en Royaume-Uni. Pure analogue, pressage et mastering audiophile à partir de bandes originales analogiques de l'époque. Maison d'édition d'origine : Roulette. Conditionnement : 1 disque vinyle 33T, pochette cartonnée simple (poids 350gr/m2) et sous-pochette doublée. Disques vinyles fournis par Planète Disque sont emballés dans un carton robuste avec intercalaires de calage et une pochette plastique luxueuse en PVC.

Ci-dessous, une description en anglais de la maison Pure Pleasure Records :

Prior to her 1959 hit "What a Difference a Day Makes," nearly every Dinah Washington recording (no matter what the style) was of interest to jazz listeners. However, after her unexpected success on the pop charts, most of Washington's sessions for Mercury and Roulette during the last four years of her life were quite commercial, with string arrangements better suited to country singers and Washington nearly parodying herself with exaggerated gestures. Fortunately, this 1963 LP is an exception, a blues-oriented collection that features Washington returning to her roots, backed by a jazz-oriented big band (with occasional strings and background voices). Eddie Chamblee and Illinois Jacquet have some tenor solos, guitarist Billy Butler is heard from, and the trumpet soloist is probably Joe Newman.

In general, this is a more successful date than Washington's earlier investigation of Bessie Smith material, since the backup band is more sympathetic and the talented singer is heard in prime form. Dinah Washington clearly had a real feeling for this bluesy material. Scott Yannow/AMG

Although she was one of the most powerful and moving of the jazz singers, Dinah Washington suffered more than most from unimaginative and erratic backings. Many of her EmArcy recordings, notably those with Clifford Brown or Clark Terry on trumpet, had outstanding performances, but her collections were compromised by unsuitable accompaniment. This set of 12 blues gives a lop-sided picture in that it doesn't include any of her ballad performances. However, the basic big band settings allow the power and verve of her singing to come through, and confirm her as the best of the women singers with blues material. During the 1950s she had been regarded as an R&B performer but arranger and band-leader Fred Norman wrote these fine 1962 jazz settings for her shortly before her death.

The material is strong and Washington soars and swings, her voice reaching many of the potent climaxes for which she was so highly regarded. The material runs through much of the traditional repertoire--Big Bill Broonzy, Leroy Carr and Lil Green being represented--and there is a nine-minute "Nobody Knows The Way I Feel This Morning" that is unique in her discography. --Steve Voce

Tracklisting

Side A: 1. The Blues Ain't Nothin' But A Woman Cryin' For Her Man 2. Romance In The Dark 3.You've Been A Good Old Wagon 4.Let Me Be The First To Know 5.How Long, How Long Blues 6.Don't Come Running Back To Me

Side B: 1. It's A Mean Old Man's World 2. Key To The Highway 3. If I Never Get To Heaven 4. Duck Before You Drown 5. No Hard Feelings 6. Nobody Knows The Way I Feel This Morning

Personnel: Sarah Vaughan, vocals /Mundell Lowe, guitar / George Duvivier, bass

Arranged and conducted by Fred Norman
Recorded July & November 1962
Roulette SR25189 – Stereo
Cat No: PPAN SR25189
Format: 180 gram LP x 1 standard sleeve
Scheduled for release June 2016
Re-mastering by: Ray Staff at Air Mastering, Lyndhurst Hall, London

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